Archive | Vintage Pattern Crush RSS feed for this section
Image

POLL! Vote on my 40s frock project for Me-Made-May!

21 Apr

Is there anything more fun, springtime-embracing, flirty, feminine and all-around blues-beating than a sweet little 1940s frock?  From making one to wearing one, it’s a pretty sure-fire mood elevator. (If you don’t want to take my word for it, go visit Cecili, because she’s the absolute master of the genre!:))

One of my goals for this year’s Me-Made-May is to complete one pattern from my A-list stash that I have yet to sew.  It’s time for one of these lovelies to see the light of day, deadline: end of May!

Want to help me decide which pattern I sew in time to wear for the end of the Me-Made-May challenge?

There are two options:

Option A (number order randomly selected from behind my back):

The sultry faux-wrap Butterick 3506, in view B for daytime (although I am utterly in love with the maxi A too), with the elegant sweeping curve at the overlapped hem. Generally wrap dresses are out for ladies with my body type, I believe that those cap sleeves- angling out giving that triangle-shaped bodice- make this *my* wrap dress!

OR….

Option B:

The flirty tie-neck, gathered-skirt Advance 3595 in view 1, with the perfect combination of feminine details and office-appropriateness, trim through the high waist, but flattering gathers through the abdomen create gently cascading skirt. I love this pattern!

SO:

Let’s vote!

Which 1940s frock should I make for Me-Made-May?

(polls)

(The link will take you to my poll at PollDaddy to vote on the dress I sew by the end of Me-Made-May!)

Thank you!!  I’m so curious to see which one gets the vote!

Image

The Cape crush: Mode Pratique 6 October 1928

28 Oct

MI11nov19284

Currently turning this one over in my brain, love the look, but a cape with a 6-inch gap in the front totally not even worth the time to make in my climate, even though I had myself talked into doing that for a day or two anyway, and had sketches of haircloth shoulder structure and neck straps to keep the thing afloat.  But once those Fargo nothing-to-stop-em-since-the-Rockies-700miles-away winds start kicking in, the reality of Open-Fronted Outerwear really sinks in as very funny hahahaha.  Especially something with built-in Toss Back And Look Saucy scarf, which would look silly layered with five other fluffy knits under.

So, now what to do to best preserve the look?  Toggles too prep school?  Hidden zip too playground?  Maybe some subtle vintage leather buckles?   I have some large coat buttons that coordinate well enough with my fabric, but together they bring  the whole thing into the 60s to me and I can no longer really visualize and enjoy the full Fall 1928 glamour of the original, so I kind of lose interest in the entire project.   Does anyone else have funny association-quirks like that to share that factor in their sewing?  Or other brilliant ideas for the scarf-cape?

BTW this one is featured in Mode Pratique of 6 Oct 1928 of which I have a copy, but it’s just the above illustration and a little article about capes in their big winter outerwear spread.  The pattern itself is in Mode Illustree in traceable form 11 Nov 1928 as far as I can make out, although I haven’t made much effort to get my hands on that one since it seems a pretty straightforward draft even for draft-dodging me.